Media

Our digital video archive stretches back to 2005. Archived events can be searched by the series title or "All Series" to see all recordings.

Explorations in the Medical Humanities events explore the enigma of how what we write relates back to the experience of bodies in different stages of health and disease. Our speakers consider how the medical and health humanities build on and revise earlier notions of the “medical arts.”

This series offers discussions, exhibitions, and performances to gather scholars, artists, students, curators, and educators who are working to bridge arts education, humanities research, and incarceration and, in the process, render visible the hidden histories of mass incarceration and radicalize arts pedagogies for a more just society.

Building Publics showcases how our Public Humanities Graduate Fellows bridge humanistic thinking with civic engagement and social justice, scholarly research with public building and communication in order to unleash new, more critical modes of scholarly imaginations. Each year highlights a new, pressing theme.

In the context of the global pandemic, these events maintain and reimagine a conversation long established among humanists and designers, social scientists and health experts, artists, artisans and planners: namely, a conversation on Care for the Polis--on the relationship between medical practices of care, cities, and their publics.

As the world grappled to deal with the fallout from COVID-19, this special series of workshops explored the impact of the pandemic on democracies worldwide. The workshops were organised by the Trinity Long Room Hub Arts and Humanities Research Institute in partnership with the SOF/Heyman..

A film and discussion series that explores architectural and territorial planning as instruments of social violence and the activists that use visual and narrative storytelling as a way to reclaim spatial rights

A forum for the discussion of books and ideas on justice, equality, and mass incarceration.

Panel discussions celebrating recent work of Columbia faculty in the Arts and Sciences

“Belongings” explores the capacious nature of belonging and belongings in various contexts with particular attention to the many ways in which its meanings intersect and interrogate the modern subject as a nodal point constituted by belongings: regimes of property; community and national identity; affective relationships and the desire to belong.

Lionel Trilling (1905-75), one of Columbia's most celebrated faculty members, was among the great humanist scholars and public intellectuals of the 20th century. In his memory, the Heyman Center sponsors a series of intellectual conversations, known as the Lionel Trilling Seminars.

An outgrowth of the popular Critical Caribbean Feminisms events, which since 2015 have been bringing together established and emerging writers from the Caribbean and its diasporas, WRITING HOME is an ode to the Americas very literally writ large. Episodes feature a contemporary cultural actor in conversation with Kaiama L. Glover & Tami Navarro.

May 18, 2022

Celebrating Recent Work by Kate Zambreno

To Write As If Already Dead circles around Kate Zambreno’s failed attempts to write a study of Hervé Guibert’s To the Friend Who Did Not Save My Life. In this diaristic, transgressive work, the first in a cycle written in the years preceding his death, Guibert documents with speed and intensity his diagnosis and disintegration from AIDS and elegizes a character based on Michel Foucault.

May 16, 2022

Ireland, Empire, and The Early Modern World by Jane Ohlmeyer

Drawing on her 2021 James Ford Lectures, Professor Jane Ohlmeyer (Trinity College Dublin) re-examines Ireland’s role in empire through the lens of early modernity. She explores four interconnected themes: Ireland as England's first colony; the Irish as active colonists; the extent to which Ireland served as a laboratory for empire in India and the Atlantic; and the impact empire had on the…

May 16, 2022

Celebrating Recent Work by Colm Tóibín

Colm Tóibín explores the heart and mind of Thomas Mann in The Magician, an intimate, complex portrait of Mann.

May 17, 2022

Book Talks in the Medical Humanities: Keith Wailoo's Pushing Cool: Big Tobacco, Racial Marketing, and the Untold Story of the Menthol Cigarette

Spanning a century, Pushing Cool reveals how the twin deceptions of health and Black affinity for menthol were crafted—and how the industry’s disturbingly powerful narrative has endured to this day.