Events

The Void of Faceless Faces: Ralph Ellison and the Matter of Black Affect

Thursday Lecture Series

Notes
  • Audience open exclusively to Columbia faculty, students, and invited guests
  • All others interested in attending, please email SOF/Heyman at [email protected].

What is a face? And what might it mean to be without one? This talk considers these, and related, questions through a reading of Ralph Ellison’s seminal novel Invisible Man. Specifically, I consider the deployment of the concept-metaphor of “facelessness” in Ellison’s text as a means of theorizing the matter of Black affect. I argue that Ellison’s rendering of Blackness as facelessness makes a key intervention into theories of affect which center on the face as the primary site of the affective encounter. Breaking with dominant conceptions of the face as a universal, anatomical reality or an ethico-affective horizon, Ellison demonstrates that the face is the product of obliterative violence––a social, political, and historical construction contingent on Black abjection.

Participants
  • Fellow Tyrone S. Palmer Lecturer in the Department of African American and African Diaspora Studies Columbia University
  • Chair Robert Gooding-Williams M. Moran Weston/Black Alumni Council Professor of African-American Studies, Professor of Philosophy and of African American and African Diaspora Studies Columbia University