Events

Stanley Cavell and John McDowell

General Programming

Cosponsor
  • University Seminar on Literary Theory
Notes
  • Free and open to the public
  • No registration necessary

Stanley Cavell will speak about "Thinking About and Eating Animals: Reflections on Coetzee's The Lives of Animals." John McDowell will respond.

Stanley Cavell is Professor Emeritus of Harvard University, where he was Walter M. Cabot Professor of Aesthetics and the General Theory of Value. His major interests center on the intersection of the analytical tradition (especially the work of Austin and Wittgenstein) with moments of the Continental tradition (for example, Heidegger and Nietzsche); with American philosophy (especially Emerson and Thoreau); with the arts (for example, Shakespeare, film and opera); and with psychoanalysis.

Among his recent publications are: A Pitch of Philosophy: Autobiographical Exercises; Philosophical Passages: Wittgenstein, Emerson, Austin, and Derrida ; and two pieces for the London Review of Books, "Nothing Goes Without Saying", a discussion of the language of three Marx Brothers films, and "Time After Time." An investigation of several Hollywood melodramas from the 30's and 40's, entitled Contesting Tears: The Melodrama of the Unknown Woman, is forthcoming.

John H. McDowell is University Professor of Philosophy at the University of Pittsburgh. Before coming to Pittsburgh in 1986, he taught at University College, Oxford. He has held visiting appointments at Harvard University, the University of Michigan, UCLA, and Princeton University. He was the John Locke Lecturer at Oxford University in 1991. His major interests are Greek philosophy, philosophy of language, philosophy of mind, metaphysics and epistemology, and ethics. He is a fellow of the British Academy and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Participants
  • John H. McDowell University Professor of Philosophy University of Pittsburgh
  • Stanley Cavell Professor Emeritus, Walter M. Cabot Professor of Aesthetics and the General Theory of Value Harvard University